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Posts Tagged ‘Tea Party’

Add Another Trillion

debt ceiling_foxIn the midst of the hullabaloo last week over the deal in Washington to end the shutdown of the U.S. government, a little fact missed the attention of most reporters and media outlets.  The public debt of the United States is now in excess of $17 trillion.

Technically, the debt ceiling was reached in May and has been stuck at the same level for months.  As a result of the continued receipt of federal taxes and other “extraordinary measures” employed by the U.S. Treasury, the nation was able to stave off default until the debt ceiling was raised again.  When the debt deal was struck, the official debt of the U.S. increased $329 billion in a day.  As a result, the official tally of the debt increased from $16.747 trillion to $17.076 trillion.

Stop and think about that for a moment.  While many politicians are touting their accomplishments of deficit reduction and fiscal restraint, the U.S. still overspent by $329 billion in less than 5 months.  While it’s an improvement over the recent annual deficits in excess of $1 trillion, the deficit is still projected to be $700-800 billion this year.

While I don’t necessarily agree with their tactics or timing, I do commend those who attempted to draw attention to the continuous deficit spending and rising national debt.  Shutting down the government was a drastic step, and in the end, it probably did little to change the current policies or debate.  However, it seems painfully obvious that something drastic needs to happen for our national leaders to get in touch with the reality that it’s impossible to borrow trillions of dollars forever.

It wasn’t very many years ago when adding another $1 trillion to the national debt would have been headline news.  Sadly, we keep breaking the next trillion-dollar mark so quickly, it barely garners anyone’s attention.  Of the $17 trillion we owe, nearly 40% of it has been borrowed within the past five years.

If you share the belief of many politicians, pundits and economists that the continual rise of the debt is not an immediate concern, then you probably won’t pay much attention as the debt continues to increase another $1 trillion in a few months.

If you think the perpetual rise of our debt poses a threat to our long-term security and prosperity, you’re probably frustrated that we reached another trillion-dollar milestone and will probably break the $20 trillion mark in the next couple of years.  It can be disconcerting to see the lack of concern over this issue, but don’t give up.  Now more than ever, you need to speak up and press for change.  It may not happen quickly or easily, but if you don’t speak out, who will?

Breaking the $17 trillion mark may have gotten lost in the noise of the deal to end the shutdown and avoiding possible default by the U.S. government.  Whether the lack of coverage was accidental or intentional, this is equally important.  The shutdown and debt ceiling were an immediate crisis, but the continuous overspending and borrowing by our government is slowing creating a future calamity, which will make the last predicament seem like a nonevent.

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The IRS and I Don’t Know

irsThe recent IRS scandal involving targeting of certain conservative groups applying for tax-exempt status is troubling on many levels. The more questions asked and the more information uncovered, the disconcerting it gets.

Aside from the potential abuse of governmental authority or violation of civil liberties, the lack of information, knowledge and candor by the IRS officials testifying before Congress is incredulous. Former acting IRS Commissioner Steven T. Miller could only muster a meek apology for not providing good customer service to the affected groups when he testified. In addition to Mr. Miller, multiple IRS officials have testified before Congress over the past three weeks. When questioned about who was responsible for this additional scrutiny, the same basic response is offered every time, “I don’t know. Without sounding overly critical, their response is lame.

The initial response from the IRS and White House blamed two rogue employees in the Cincinnati, OH Service Center. Doesn’t it make sense you might know the names of the individuals if you say its two people? Even if someone didn’t know their identity at the time, I think you could track them down in three weeks. Additionally, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) investigated this practice for nearly a year before the report was made public. Why wasn’t the TIGTA able to determine who was involved?

As some of the groups targeted by the IRS have come forth, it is obvious involvement went beyond two low-level employees in Cincinnati. IRS inquiry letters have been produced from multiple locations, signed by various individuals, including Lois Lerner, the head of the IRS Exempt Organizations Division responsible for approving these applications.

These are not low-level employees who are testifying. They are highly paid professionals responsible for the direction and operations of the IRS. It’s not realistic for them to know everything happening at the IRS, but it is their job to find out. Professing ignorance and blaming subordinates is not commensurate with they pay and position.

As someone who interacts with the IRS on a continual basis and has responded to countless IRS inquiries and audits, telling an IRS agent “I don’t know” isn’t sufficient. You may not know the answer at the moment, but you have to find out. When you meet or talk with an agent, you’re supposed to be prepared to answer their inquiries. Justifiably, IRS personnel get frustrated and annoyed if you can’t answer many of their questions and everything is delayed.

The IRS sends you a list of questions or inquiries ahead of time. While Congress may not provide a list of questions in advance, questions like “How did this happen?” or “Who is responsible?” seem rather obvious. To appear before Congress without any ability or intention of answering those questions is mystifying.

As some Members of Congress have already pointed out, the IRS should be held to the same standards of cooperation and responsiveness they expect from the U.S. taxpayers. If “I don’t know” won’t fly with the IRS, “I don’t know” shouldn’t fly for the IRS.

Targeted by the IRS

irsIf you have ever been audited by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), it’s natural to feel like you have been singled out. It’s like getting pulled over for speeding. Regardless of your actions, you often feel like the authorities should be spending their time pursuing more important criminals. Despite your feelings, rarely are you being targeted by the IRS.

Shockingly, the IRS admitted last week that they had unfairly and inappropriately targeted certain nonprofit organizations because of their beliefs and affiliations. For over two years, IRS employees signaled out conservative groups with names or verbiage including “Tea Party,” “Patriot” and “Obamacare” for additional scrutiny. The IRS admitted this in advance of the pending release of a report by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) criticizing their behavior.

The IRS claimed the targets were nonpolitical and initiated by low-level employees in the Cincinnati, OH Service Center. The additional scrutiny may not have been ordered by a political appointee, but it seems obvious the additional attention and inquiries were politically motivated. Over the past few years “Tea Party” has as much a political connotation as Democrat or Republican. Additionally, it doesn’t appear any liberal-leaning groups received the same scrutiny. As a result, it seems hard to believe the IRS actions were not politically motivated.

It also appears the knowledge of this behavior went much higher than a few low-level staffers churning through documents in Cincinnati. Lois Lerner, the head of the IRS Exempt Organizations Division, found out about it in June 2011, and despite her instructions to change the review guidelines, the additional inquiries continued throughout 2012. In May 2012, Douglas Shulman, the IRS Commissioner at the time, and Steven T. Miller, his deputy and the current acting Commissioner, also learned of these targeted reviews. Both of these men failed to notify Congress, despite questions from several Senators and Representatives regarding the IRS scrutiny of these conservative groups.

No matter your political affiliation or beliefs, this acknowledgement by the IRS should be of grave concern for all Americans. It’s an extremely precarious position when government officials at any level, abuse their authority for political purposes. Those actions are characteristic of dictators and oppressive regimes; not what’s expected in a free, democratic republic.

You may not have much regard for the ideas and people affiliated with the Tea Party movement, but that should not matter. If the IRS has the ability to target them, they can also come after you.

The IRS claims no exemption was ultimately withheld from any applicant. This reassurance is also subtle claim of exoneration for their actions. The IRS is essentially trying to assert “No harm, no foul.” Even though no exemption was denied, it doesn’t mean these organizations didn’t suffer injury. Given the complexity of the rules, taxpayers often hire professional advisors. These organizations may have incurred substantial fees complying with the additional IRS inquiries, not to mention the delay in being able to pursue their stated mission.

The abuse seems limited to a certain group of employees handling a specific group of taxpayers and is not widespread throughout the IRS. If you receive an IRS notice, it’s probably not politically motivated. However, these actions, albeit limited, set a very dangerous precedent and deserve exceptional scrutiny by our leaders and the public at large.

No one likes to be examined or questioned by the IRS, but it’s part of dealing with a voluntary tax system. However, no one should ever be targeted for political purposes. Dealing with the IRS can be annoying, but being targeted for your political beliefs or affiliations is absolutely wrong, and should be criminal.