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The IRS Defense

The IRS Commissioner John Koskinen has spent a lot of time on Capitol Hill this past week answering questions about the Internal Revenue Service’s targeting ofirs certain political groups and the ongoing Congressional investigations.

Depending upon your political persuasion, you probably see this as a potential conspiracy deserving investigation, or you think this is nothing more than political grandstanding in an election year. Beyond the political theatrics, which are part of all Congressional hearings, there are some serious issues involved, not the least of them is the Service’s response to Congressional inquiries.

While you may disagree with the premise and conduct of the investigations and hearings, the IRS’s response is troubling, irrespective of political affiliations or leanings. As an American taxpayer, do you think you could handle an IRS audit the same way the IRS is responding to Congressional inquiries?

Documentation and Missing Information

The timeliness of providing documentation to Congress has been a point of contention. The investigation started over a year ago, yet some documents still have not been produced. The biggest bombshell hit last week, when the IRS informed Congress it could not provide some of the e-mails from Lois Lerner (the IRS official at the center of the controversy who has pled the 5th Amendment at two different Congressional hearings) due to a computer crash. They noted that six other employees also involved in the investigation experienced computer failures and lost e-mails during the same time period. Despite knowing about these computer issues in February, the IRS didn’t notify Congress until June, but notified the Treasury Department in April.

Everyone has probably encountered computer issues and lost information before. That’s understandable. However, the IRS has strict documentation requirements for taxpayers. You are required to retain your documents for at least three to seven years; sometimes longer. An IRS auditor can disallow a deduction if you don’t have the appropriate documentation.   Imagine telling an IRS agent you can’t produce the requested documents because of a computer crash and you destroyed the backups. Consider how skeptical the agent would be if you knew about it early in the audit process, but waited for months before disclosing it. Do you think the agent would take your word that all is okay and move on?

The IRS is also contending it doesn’t matter that some of the e-mails have been lost, as they cite the thousands of documents they have provided. This is analogous to providing boxes of receipts to substantiate your business expenses, but not providing the ones for your personal vacation you deducted as a travel expense. You can argue with the agent that the mounds of unrelated documents prove everything is legitimate, but it may not be. Furthermore, the agent is under no obligation to simply take your word for it.

The Law v. Common Sense

In a tense exchange between Commissioner Koskinen and South Carolina Congressman Trey Gowdy, the Commissioner stated there was no criminal wrongdoing by anyone at the IRS. Congressman Gowdy, a former federal prosecutor, asked what federal statutes Mr. Koskinen had reviewed to determine no criminal wrongdoing had occurred. The Commissioner responded that he hadn’t reviewed any laws. Instead, he was relying upon common sense that nothing inappropriate occurred.

Try using the common sense argument with the IRS. No Mr. IRS auditor, I don’t know what the law says about reporting that income or deducting those expenses, but relying upon common sense, it must be okay. Certainly the IRS agent will agree with your common sense approach and ignore the tax code.

Attitude

All of the IRS officials’ testimony seems to project an attitude that we’ve done nothing wrong; trust us; now leave us alone. In his recent testimony, Commissioner Koskinen’s demeanor appeared brash, indignant and borderline arrogant when responding to questions. Some of his supporters cheered his behavior, and thought he was standing his ground while being bullied by the Republican interrogators. While no one deserves to be disrespected or berated, the Commissioner showed no sense of remorse for anything and projected an aura of annoyance that he was being questioned.

Again, you should put this in context of an IRS audit. Imagine meeting with an IRS agent and displaying the same type of defiant attitude. Theoretically, IRS personnel should conduct themselves in the same manner no matter how you act or what you say, but do you honestly think that’s true? A basic understanding of human nature tells you that a contentious and condescending attitude will cause the auditor to be more suspect and less lenient in accepting anything that’s questionable.

The IRS Defense

Therefore, the next time you are audited by the IRS, consider employing the IRS defense strategy.

  • You don’t have to worry about missing documents if you inundate them with other information, and if can’t produce the documents, they should just trust you that everything is correct;
  • You don’t have to apply tax law, so long as your common sense tells you it’s correct;
  • You can be brash, indignant and uncooperative because you’ve done nothing wrong, and the IRS is responsible for wasting your time and taxpayers’ money.

On second thought, maybe this isn’t a very good defense and could cost you a lot of time and money in the long run. However, if it works for the IRS why shouldn’t it work for you? Furthermore, if this is how the IRS acts when it’s scrutinized, why should taxpayers be expected to act differently?

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