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Posts Tagged ‘banks’

Is The Fed Giving a Pass on Sovereign Debt?

Part of the role of the Federal Reserve (the Fed) is to provide oversight to their member banks.  Approximately one-third of all U.S. commercial banks are members of the Federal Reserve.  All national banks are required to be members, and certain state chartered banks can choose to become a member.

Fed oversight involves a variety of bank operations.  Recently, the Fed conducted stress tests of the large national banks.  The purpose was to assess the strength of the bank and their ability to withstand another major economic calamity, like what happened throughout 2008.  One of their goals is preventing any bank from becoming “too big to fail.”

Bank capital is one of the measures regulators use to measure bank strength and stability.  Bank capital requirements are intended to guarantee a bank is able to withstand certain losses in its investment and loan portfolio and still meet the withdrawal demands of its depositors.

The following article describes a Citigroup analysis which discovered a recent trend in the U.S. and Europe regarding bank capital requirements and sovereign debt.  The Citigroup study revealed that bank regulators at the Fed and their European counterparts were not counting sovereign debt as part of the bank capital requirements.  The Citigroup analysts concluded the primary reason for excluding the sovereign debt was to help guarantee a market for sovereign bonds.

The United States and European countries are currently experiencing huge budget deficits.  In order to keep their respective governments operating, the nations’ treasuries and central banks are issuing new government bonds on a daily basis.  Thus, there is a constant need for someone to purchase these bonds.  If the market for a particular nation’s bond were to disappear, catastrophe would quickly follow.  Consider what would happen in the U.S. if investors stopped buying the additional $100 billion of new bonds it takes to keep the U.S. government operating each month.

Just imagine what would happen to inflation and the U.S. economy if investors are reluctant to purchase U.S. Treasuries.  You only have to look at the current problems in Europe.  Spanish 10-year bonds issued this past week carried an interest rate in excess of 6% while 10-year U.S. Treasuries were selling around 1.75%.  If the U.S. had to pay interest on our $15.8 trillion debt at a 6% rate, the annual interest cost would be near $1 trillion.  Think that might negatively impact the economy?

The Fed and European Central Bank are largely responsible for the monetary policy of their respective nations.  Interest rates and inflation are critical factors affecting monetary policy and economic results.  Consequently, you can see the vested interest the Federal Reserve and European Central Bank have in making sure there is a steady market for sovereign debt.   As a result, it appears these institutions are willing to give favorable treatment to sovereign debt when measuring bank capital.

I’m not implying there is collusion amongst the bankers.  Contrary to what some people believe, I don’t there is some grand conspiracy.  With a few exceptions, most of the people involved are honest people doing their best in a very difficult economic and political environment.  Central bankers are given tremendous responsibility for a nation’s economic health, yet they are seldom the people making important decisions on taxes, spending and debt, which greatly impact the economy.

My primary purpose in writing this article is sharing information.  I haven’t seen many articles addressing this topic, so I thought it was worth discussing.  Additionally, I think it’s another indication of the long-term problems of deficit spending and huge national debt.   Without realizing it, policy makers can make poor decisions in order to encourage people to buy sovereign debt, because it will be catastrophic if it ever stops.  It’s like a house of cards that’s growing and requires more effort to keep it from collapsing.

Time will tell, but it seems like exempting sovereign debt from bank capital requirements might be one of those decisions.

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Controlling Economic Growth with the Federal Reserve Discount Rate

The Federal Reserve (the Fed) is charged with managing the U.S. money supply and keeping inflation in check.  Increasing the money supply (i.e., printing money) is intended to spur economic growth.  Additional money is supposed to make it less expensive to borrow, thereby encouraging investment and growth. It also devalues the dollar against other currencies, which should increase exports by making American goods less expensive to buy internationally.

The Conference Board includes the Federal Reserve money supply as part of its composite index of leading economic indicators.  Bankers, economists, currency traders and exporters are particularly tuned into the supply of money in the financial system.    

The discount rate is another primary tool the Fed utilizes to achieve its objectives.  The discount rate is the interest rate the Fed charges other banks to borrow from it. 

If banks are in the business of lending money, why are they borrowing from the Fed?  It’s called leverage.  Being able to borrow money from the Fed allows banks to leverage their deposits and loans.  Banks only keep a fraction of the money deposited to them on hand.  The rest is loaned out.  However, if you want your money, they have to be able to pay you when you to withdraw it.  The ability to borrow from the Fed allows banks the ability to keep fewer reserves and lend more money. Consequently, the discount rate affects the interest rate banks charge you to borrow money.

In general, the Fed increases the discount rate when the economy is doing well.  Raising the interest rate slows growth, which is intended to keep inflation in check.  Furthermore, in good economic times, people don’t need as much of an incentive to take risks or borrow money and are willing to pay a higher interest rate to access capital.  Conversely, in recessionary times, the Fed will reduce the discount rate to lower lending rates and spur economic growth. 

If you study the history of the Fed discount rate, you’ll see increases during periods of economic prosperity and rate cuts during recessions.  The size and timing of the rate cuts or increases are indications of the economic conditions. 

This is evidenced in the Fed discount rate over the past two years. The Fed dropped the rate seven times in 2008, reducing the rate by 0.75% three times.  The rate was 0.5% at the end of 2008, and hasn’t been that low in over 30 years.  This is an indication of the severity of the current recession, as if you needed another sign.

The Fed raised the rate 0.25% in February 2010, on signs the economy was strengthening.  However, the Fed has indicated that it doesn’t expect any rate increases for an extended period of time.  With rumblings that the recovery is slowing, the Fed may be pushed to lower the rate once again, but it doesn’t have much further it can go.

You don’t have to wear yourself out trying to understand monetary policy, money supply and inflation factors.  If you want to get a quick synopsis of the Fed’s current view on the economy, just watch their action on the discount rate.  No change means you can expect things to stay the same for a while.  A reduction is a sign of trouble, and an increase is an indication that things are getting better.

With the Fed saying that they expect to hold the discount rate static for an extended period of time, you can expect the economy to continue to slog along.  It may not be great, but hopefully it doesn’t get worse.