Home > Government & Politics > Decoding the Debt Debate

Decoding the Debt Debate

If you’re following the current debate on raising the debt ceiling, you’re probably frustrated.  Your angst may be triggered by, the partisan bickering, the lack of great leadership or the uncertainty of what may happen and what it all means.

Politicians from all political persuasions and affiliations have become very adept at obfuscation.  Knowing whatever they say or do can and will be used against them in a future election, politicians have become very proficient in deflecting and dodging direct answers.  They speak in vague terms and try to boil everything down to a 30 second sound bite.

Politicians and political commentators often use terminology that is confusing and often misleading.  You almost need a secret decoder to decipher what they are saying.  I don’t all of the secret codes, but I have a few.

As you listen to the debate, the following are a few terms to keep in mind.

  • The National Debt – The cumulative amount of money owed by the U.S. government. These are actual bonds held by various investors (including the Chinese government and your friendly bank).  The total outstanding debt is approximately $14.5 trillion.
  • The Debt Ceiling – The total amount of bonds the U.S. Treasury is authorized to issue.  The debt ceiling is currently equal to the National Debt.  A law must be passed to increase the debt limit.
  • Deficit – This is the amount of money the government is spending in excess of revenues it collects in one fiscal year (October 1 – September 30).  The deficit for fiscal 2011 is projected to be $1.4 trillion.
  • Credit Rating – Every bond traded on a public market is rated by an independent credit rating agency, which assesses the financial strength of the issuer and the likelihood of default.  The lower the rating, the higher the interest rate required.  For bonds already issued, a change in credit rating will often influence the price at which the bond is traded on the market.

Aside from these terms bantered about, I believe there are a few important factors you need to pay close attention to in any deal that is reached.  These will be the types of issues our  political leaders will attempt to obfuscate.

  • Time Horizon – The time horizon for the spending cuts and additional revenues will be calculated over the next 10 years.   If Congress and the President agree to cut $1 trillion in spending, it won’t all come in fiscal 2012.  They may sound like everything is happening this year, but any plan will be adopted over the next decade.  Raising the debt ceiling is the only thing to take effect immediately.
  •  Timing – Look at the timing for when additional revenue is received and spending cuts are enacted.  If history repeats itself, the revenues will start to be received soon, and the  bulk of the spending cuts will happen in the latter years.  In the world of pork barrel politics, elected officials use government spending to buy votes, and the termination of programs will frequently cost votes.  Thus, politicians have a real incentive to defer spending cuts to another day.
  • Details –It won’t be easy, but do your best to understand the details of the plan.  Congress is trying to make major changes to the tax code, Social Security, Medicare and  Medicaid, and they’re rushing to get it done in the next few days.  I don’t think you want a repeat of Nancy Pelosi’s famous quote, “We have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it.”

I believe this is a serious issue, and how it is resolved could have far-reaching implications for the future.  No one knows what will happen if the government defaults on its debt, since it has never happened.  As I previously wrote, I think Congress will and should raise the debt ceiling, but it also needs to curtail government spending.  Racking up over $1 trillion of debt each year is just as perilous as defaulting on the current obligations by not raising the debt ceiling.

I also have serious reservations about our leaders’ability and willingness to cut spending.  The 2011 budget compromise is a good illustration of this.  Although they supposedly agreed to $38 billion in spending cuts, most of it was accounting gimmicks and money that wasn’t going to be spent anyway.  One analyst calculated the reduction in spending on specific programs to be less than $1 billion in comparison to fiscal 2010.

As the debate continues forward, follow closely.  Here’s why.  Last week, President Obama was pushing a plan to cut spending by $3.7 trillion and add $1 trillion of new revenue, for a net decrease of $2.7 trillion over the next decade.  Sound like a reasonable compromise?  Before deciding, you may want to consider this.  When the Administration presented their 2012 budget to Congress, they also provided a 10-year budget estimate.  The Administration projected total deficits over the next 10 years to be in excess of $9 trillion.  If the current deal cuts it by $2.7 trillion, that still means we’ll add over $6 trillion to the national debt, pushing out total debt close to $21 trillion by the end of the decade.  Still think it’s a good deal?

To me this is a good example of why we must watch this closely.  Despite the political rancor, everyone in Washington is looking for a deal which will make them look good.  Let’s just make sure the American people get as good of a deal as our politicians.

Advertisements
  1. jesse
    July 26, 2011 at 11:36 AM

    Thanks Bob for breaking this down for us common folk.:)

    I needed it!

    Appreciate you,

    Jesse

  2. July 26, 2011 at 12:23 PM

    I am linking back to this. People need to read this so that they can see and judge for themselves what is going on in Washington and what needs to be done.

    • August 5, 2011 at 12:21 PM

      Very valid, pithy, succcint, and on point. WD.

  3. July 26, 2011 at 4:22 PM

    Thanks.

  1. July 26, 2011 at 12:27 PM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: