Home > Government & Politics > Raising the National Debt Ceiling

Raising the National Debt Ceiling

Within a matter of days, the U.S. Treasury is expected to hit the ceiling on its authority to borrow money on behalf of the U.S. Government.  Treasury Secretary Geithner has already made plans to extend this timeframe by a couple of months.  Most of it involves deferring payments and accounting gimmicks to buy the President and Congress more time.

I have no doubt that the debt ceiling will be raised.  With a projected budget deficit of nearly $1.5 trillion this year, there is no way our politicians will balance the budget any time soon.  Thus, the Treasury will need to continue to borrow more money to fund the government.  The real issue is how much more borrowing will be allowed and what spending cuts and fiscal reforms will be enacted.

For the most part, the debate over raising the debt ceiling is political theater and brinkmanship.  Sadly, it’s another example of the dysfunction in Washington.  If it wasn’t so serious, it would be funny.  A couple of years ago when George W. Bush was President, the Democrats resisted raising the debt ceiling and the Republicans argued that it was necessary.  Now that President Obama occupies the Oval Office, it’s exactly the opposite.  The Republicans are balking and the Democrats are calling them irresponsible.

Most of the Members in Congress would like to raise the debt limit by $2 trillion, which would fund the government until after the 2012 election.   At the current rate of overspending, the limit would be reached shortly after the 113th Congress is seated and the President is inaugurated in 2013.

Earlier this week, Speaker Boehner said that the Republicans want to cut spending by the same amount that the debt ceiling is raised.  Given the recent agreement on the 2011 budget, it’s doubtful the Republicans will come anywhere near this goal.  While campaigning in 2010, the Republicans promised to cut $100 billion from the 2011 budget.  The final  agreement was $38 billion. Of that amount, a substantial portion included accounting gimmicks and money that wasn’t going to be spent anyway. If they couldn’t agree to cut spending by $100 million, how in the world will they ever come close to eliminating a $1.5 trillion annual budget deficit?

If you believe the U.S. Government needs some significant changes in its fiscal policy, then you must pay very close attention to what happens, and you’ll need to do some digging to get to the truth.  It’s unfortunate, but you can’t take statements by our elected officials at face value.  Most of what they say is political posturing and spin.  Rarely do they tell the whole truth.  There is often more to the story.  The real truth of the $38 million of spending cuts in the latest budget deal is a prime example.

As much as I am troubled by the growing national debt, I think raising the debt ceiling is necessary.  To immediately cut $1.5 trillion of spending from a $3.5 trillion budget is too much too quickly. However, it doesn’t mean that significant changes can’t be made.  The President and Congress need to stop patting themselves on the back for cutting less than 1.5% of total spending.  It’s a pittance in relationship to the magnitude of the problem.

Raising the debt ceiling is necessary to avoid a current crisis, and making significant cuts to the current spending and fiscal policies is needed to evade a long-term catastrophe.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: