Home > Taxes > Tax Tip: Self-Employed Health Insurance

Tax Tip: Self-Employed Health Insurance

While the debate over health care and health insurance continues in the U.S., there is one thing we call agree on… health insurance is expensive.  If you are paying for health insurance, any tax benefits you receive will help reduce the effective cost of your coverage.

A majority of people in the U.S. receive their health insurance coverage as a tax-free employee fringe benefit.  You may contribute to the expense, but the portion your employer pays is typically tax-free to you.  In order to attain parity between an employer and someone who is self-employed, self-employed taxpayers are allowed to deduct 100% of their premiums in calculating their adjusted gross income.  While it may seem logical and fair, it was not always this way.

In order to take the deduction, you must have self-employment income equal to or greater than your health insurance premiums.  Your salary, wages, interest, dividends, pension and other income are not considered self-employment income.  Thus, the portion of insurance you are contributing to your employee benefits and premiums you are paying while unemployed do not count.  The premiums may be deductible as an itemized deduction, but they do not qualify for the self-employed health insurance deduction.

There are a couple of changes that can affect your 2010 tax liability.

  • Your health insurance premiums are treated as a deduction for calculating your net self-employment income, which will reduce the self-employment taxes you pay.  This benefit is only applicable for 2010, unless otherwise extended by Congress.
  • The IRS has determined that Medicare Part B premiums can be treated as self-employed health insurance premiums.  Thus, if you are over 65 and are having Medicare Part B premiums deducted from your Social Security check, you can deduct the premiums if you have net self-employment income greater than or equal to your Medicare Part B premiums.
  • After March 30, 2010, any premiums paid for a child who is under age 27 will qualify for the deduction.
  • After March 30, 2010, the deduction is not allowed for anyone who is eligible to participate in any subsidized health insurance plan for themselves, their spouse or dependent (i.e., you can’t deduct your portion of the premiums paid as part of a subsidized employer health plan).

If you are self-employed or have self-employed income, the self-employed health insurance deduction may help reduce the cost of maintaining health insurance coverage.  The tax savings may not make get you over the affordability hump, but if you are paying, you might as well take advantage of whatever tax breaks you can.

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