Home > Taxes > Tax Tip: Self-Employment Taxes

Tax Tip: Self-Employment Taxes

Self-Employment taxes are Social Security and Medicare taxes.  If you are an employee, half of the taxes are withheld from your paychecks and the other half is paid by your employer.  If you are self-employed, you get to pay all of the taxes yourself.   Lucky you.

Self-employment taxes are assessed upon your net self-employment income over $400.  Without delving into all of the various types of self-employment income, it basically means being paid for your hard work and efforts.  It does not include interest income, dividends, capital gains, pensions or other investment income.  Some of the common forms of self-employed income include:

  • Net earnings from a trade or business
  • Consulting and director fees
  • Tips
  • Payments for any services you provide to another person (e.g., maintenance, repairs, cleaning)
  • Pass through income from a partnership or limited liability company

A portion of your self-employed income may be reported to you on a 1099-MISC or a partnership Schedule K-1, but it’s highly likely that some self-employed income won’t be reported to you.  The income is taxable to you even if you don’t receive a 1099, Schedule K-1 or other tax reporting statement, and getting paid in cash doesn’t mean you don’t have to report the income.

Just like an employee, the tax is divided between Social Security and Medicare.  The Social Security tax portion is assessed at 12.4% on the first $106,800 of income for 2010 and 2011.  Since there is no cap on Medicare earnings, you’ll pay 2.9% on all of your self-employed income, no matter how high it goes.  The good news is that you get to deduct half of the self-employment tax in computing your adjusted gross income.  The bad news is that if you’re married, you and your spouse are subject to the tax separately.

There is one taxpayer favorable provision that you want to take advantage of in 2010.  For this year only, you can deduct your self-employed health insurance premiums in determining your net self-employed income.  It’s a one-year benefit, unless Congress decides to extend it.

Special rules can apply to farmers, real estate professionals, ministers, and investors.  It can get complex rather quickly, and the myriad of potential issues are beyond the scope of this article.  If you have questions or wonder if certain income is subject to self-employment taxes or exempt, you should consult a tax professional. 

With an effective tax rate that can be over 15%, self-employment taxes add up quickly.  Better to get it right, than be surprised with an unexpected tax bill later.

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