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A Financial Resolution for 2011

Happy New Year!  New Year’s resolutions often accompany the celebrations and revelry.  A majority of resolutions are related to personal health and fitness, which is understandable following a season dominated by parties and indulgent eating.  Christmas is also the time of year when people spend more money than expected.  The stress of the bills coming due can also lead to financial resolutions. 

January 1 is a great time to lose weight, get in shape and stop smoking.  It’s also a fantastic time to get your financial affairs in order.  What is one financial objective that you would like to achieve for 2011?

I won’t be surprised if your answer involves reducing debt, saving more money or living by a budget.  While these are common financial goals, they are not an exclusive list.  You can also include things like giving more money away, drafting a will, reviewing your insurance policies or buying a new home.

Whatever your objective, here are a few principles that will help to ensure your success.

  • Be Reasonable: If the goal is unreasonable, you’ll quickly become frustrated and discouraged.  It may not be reasonable to get out of debt in one year.  Instead, set a goal to reduce your debt by $__ or pay off certain credit cards.
  • Be Specific:  Vague goals like eating healthier or being a better money manager are hard to evaluate.  Your goals should be quantifiable and measurable.
  • Develop a Plan: Whatever you want to achieve isn’t going to miraculously happen.  Think about the steps needed to accomplish your goal. Your plan should also include a timetable.  Identify the actions and the dates for completion.
  • Write it Down: It’s easy for the urgent things of the day to overtake the important. Writing down your goals and plan will help keep you on track.
  • Measure Progress:  Don’t wait until December 31 to determine success or failure.  Periodically evaluate your advancement.  You may need to adjust your plan in order to still achieve your goals.
  • Be Accountable: Behavioral changes are not easy, and being accountable to someone can be the difference between success and failure.  You must have enough of a relationship to trust the person, be honest with them, and listen to their feedback.  They must also be willing to ask you the tough questions.
  • Reward Yourself: Develop appropriate rewards as you accomplish your interim goals.  It doesn’t have to be big or lavish.  It just needs to be something that motivates you.

I know it’s kind of morbid, but by December 31, 2011 you’ll either be dead or one year older. Assuming that you expect to be alive, would you rather have accomplished your financial goal or not?  If so, then develop a plan and have the resolve to see it through to completion.

If you do… it will truly be a Happy New Year… for the entire year and not just one day.

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  1. Vivian Bills
    January 1, 2011 at 4:03 PM

    Nice, PB! I’m going to print this one out! Happy New Year!

  2. jesse
    January 4, 2011 at 10:14 PM

    A good process bro!

    jesse

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